A Day in the Life of Having Type 2 Diabetes: Stay in the Moment

Phyllisa Derose

By Phyllisa Deroze In this blog post, Diabetes Advocate Phyllisa Deroze shares her story of being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and how it affects her life on a daily basis. When I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in 2011, I was surprised, confused, and overwhelmed. My diagnosis came a week after my primary … Read more>>

Rheumatoid Arthritis: “I’m a Nurse Not a Patient”

Kathy Furbee

In this blog post, Kathleen Furbee shares her story of being diagnosed with and treated for rheumatoid arthritis and how after 10 years of treatment she is grateful for the medical advances that allow her to live a full and happy life. By Kathleen Furbee             When I was in my early fifties I came down with … Read more>>

Uterine Cancer: Why Not Me?

Cathy Samargo bw

In this blog post, Catherine Samargo shares her story of being diagnosed and treated for uterine cancer. She reflects upon what it was like to receive a cancer diagnosis in the midst of other family tragedies and how her mindset slowly shifted from one of victimization to one of compassion for all human beings enduring … Read more>>

Who knew I had Glaucoma? I Didn’t.

stephanie-370x320-thumb-290xauto-436

Approximately half of the glaucoma population in the U.S. goes undiagnosed  Article by Stephanie Handler Originally published by the Glaucoma Research Foundation. On April 19, 2011, I was diagnosed with glaucoma, a serious eye disease that can lead to blindness. I made an appointment with my local ophthalmology clinic in San Francisco as soon as I noticed … Read more>>

Hyperhidrosis: More Than Just Sweating

MollyN

This blog post features Molly Nair, a young woman living with hyperhidrosis. November is Hyperhidrosis Awareness Month and Ms. Nair shares how this condition has affected her life since she was in elementary school. She details what it is like to live with hyperhidrosis, the obstacles she has faced because of it, and how she … Read more>>

Jen’s Story: An Announcement – From MBC to Sarcoidosis and Beyond

Jen112

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we bring you Jen’s story… Jen is a seven-year breast cancer survivor, though she still struggles with that term. At 32, she was mistakenly diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. She was treated for metastatic breast cancer for four-and-a-half years before her doctors concluded that she was in remission … Read more>>

Trials and Tribulations: Navigating the Clinical Trial Space

KarenR

After being diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2014, Karen J. Ribler, a retired association director from Washington, D.C., became an active volunteer within the ovarian cancer community. She helps educate student doctors and nurses through the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance’s Survivors Teaching Students program, and serves on the Board of Directors for Ovarian and Gynecologic Cancer Coalition/Rhonda’s … Read more>>

Alan’s Story: I have a Rare Disease and I am Crossing Borders – #RareDiseaseDay2018

HEALTHWISE WALES, CARDIFF, 23/02/2016

Our guest post on this Rare Disease Day 2018 comes from Alan who lives in Whales and is fighting ataxia head on. Alan is raising awareness of this disease through his blog and on social media. Connect with Alan to learn more: www.ataxiaandme.org Facebook @ataxiaandme Twitter @ataxiaandme Instagram @ataxia_and_me Alan’s Story I have a Rare … Read more>>

Rennie’s Story: Looking So Good, Feeling So Bad – Living with MS

Rennie

Our guest blog post today comes from Rennie R., an MS patient advocate, public speaker, and retired high school teacher, who has been living with multiple sclerosis since June 2003. She shares what it’s like to live with the invisible symptoms of MS, when you “look so good” but actually feel so bad. Visit Rennie’s … Read more>>

Anne’s Story: Adapting to Life With MS

AnneP

Learning to adapt is key to managing any chronic illness. Our guest blogger, Anne P., shares the hurdles of life with multiple sclerosis in today’s post. – Anne’s Story I have multiple sclerosis and many “MSers”, myself included, get really frustrated by the fact that our disease is often invisible. Especially in the early stages of … Read more>>